How to Make a Snow Cone

in Snow

According to Bobby Joeheart, a former Snow Cone vendor for her church, there is a right way and several wrong ways to make a snow cone – or snowball, as some people call them. Snow cones aren’t just eaten for their fantastic flavor, but also because of the cooling effect they can have on the body on a hot day.

Joeheart describes one experience where she was given a free sample of a snow cone from some people on their opening day of business in a new location. “When I received the sample, everything looked good,” says Joeheart, “and I said to myself, ‘I am going to buy one from them after I enjoy this free sample.’ To my surprise the sample snowball had absolutely no taste. It was like eating iced water.” The snow cone was supposed to be blackberry flavored, but while it had all the color, it was so watered down the taste was all gone. This is the one of the wrong ways of making a snow cone.

Never dilute the syrup. Always use full strength syrup. Lots of snow cone vendors don’t shave their ice, mainly because they grind their snow cones with crushed ice. Most snow cone machines won’t shave crushed ice, but they will crush the ice a little finer. This is another wrong way of making snow cones. The problem with crushed ice is after you have enjoyed and swallowed the sweetness of the syrup in your mouth, all that remains is the unflavored ice, slowly dissolving until it’s all gone. Always make your snow cone with shaved ice. That way, when you enjoy the sweetness of the syrup in your mouth and swallow it, the shaved ice is melted and swallowed with it. That means you’re instantly ready for another round of cooling, sweet tasting enjoyment.

Always use blocks or chunks of ice when making snow cones. The snow cone machine will shave the block or chunk of ice as it is pushed down on the spinning blade of the cutting disk. Always use dry shaved ice to make your snow cones. Use your ice immediately after being shaved, or shave it directly onto the paper cone. This way the ice is dry – very shortly after it starts to melt. As it melts, water will surround the minute crystals of ice. You only want to syrup to surround the minute crystal of ice, otherwise it will cause the watered down effect.

Finally, wrapping it up. Let there be no voids in the paper cone. Pack the cone with ice from the bottom to the top of the cup and finish it with the ice above the top lip of the cup, creating a ball on top. Pour syrup on the snow cone until it comes to the top of the paper cone.

To sum up, here are seven simple steps to creating the perfect snow cone:

1. Never dilute the syrup. Always use full strength syrup.
2. Always make your snow cone with shaved ice.
3. Always use blocks or chunks of ice when grinding snow cones.
4. Always use dry shaved ice to make your snow cones.
5. Pack the cone with ice from the bottom to the top of the cup.
6. Finish your snow cone with ice above the top lip of the cup, creating a ball on top.
7. Pour syrup on the snow cone until it comes to the top of the cup.

If you follow Bobby Joeheart’s instructions for making a snow cone, you’ll have your customers coming back for more again and again.

Bobby Joeheart. “The Correct Way to Make a Snow Cone.” Ezine Articles. 18 Sep. 2009 [http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Correct-Way-to-Make-a-Snow-Cone&id=2887460].

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In 1979, Snowie was originally called Sno Shack, and the first 13 shacks were located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Creator Carl Rupp built his first stand out of cedar wood. He even invented his own ice shavers for the business. By the time he had set up 13 outlets around town and hired a crew of local teens as attendants, things started to get unmanageable. Luckily, other people had started approaching him with offers to buy a single shack and shaver to run it themselves. A few years and setbacks later, Carl and his brother Gordon created the multi-billion dollar Snowie company.

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How to Make a Snow Cone

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This article was published on 2009/09/19